Indian fairy tales

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu Killed the Giants

Now, after a time, Raja Rasâlu arrived at Nila city, and as he entered the town he saw an old woman making unleavened bread, and as she made it she sometimes wept, and sometimes laughed; so Rasâlu asked her why she wept and laughed, but she answered sadly, as she…

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu Played Chaupur With King Sarkap

Now, when evening came, Raja Rasâlu went forth to play chaupur with King Sarkap, and as he passed some potters’ kilns he saw a cat wandering about restlessly; so he asked what ailed her that she never stood still, and she replied, ‘My kittens are in an unbaked pot in…

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu Was Born

Once there lived a great Raja, whose name was Sâlbâhan, and he had two Queens. Now the elder, by name Queen Achhrâ, had a fair young son called Prince Pûran; but the younger, by name Lonâ, though she wept and prayed at many a shrine, had never a child to…

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu Went Out Into the World

Young Rasâlu lived on, far from the light of day, for eleven long years, growing tall and strong, yet contented to remain playing with his colt and talking to his parrot; but when the twelfth year began, the lad’s heart leapt up with desire for change, and he loved to…

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu’s Friends Forsook Him

Now, on the first day, Raja Rasâlu journeyed far, until he came to a lonely forest, where he halted for the night. And seeing it was a desolate place, and the night dark, he determined to set a watch. So he divided the time into three watches, and the carpenter…

Indian fairy talesJoseph Jacobs

How the Wicked Sons Were Duped

How the wicked sons were duped A very wealthy old man, imagining that he was on the point of death, sent for his sons and divided his property among them. However, he did not die for several years afterwards; and miserable years many of them were. Besides the weariness of…

Andrew Lang’s Fairy BooksIndian fairy tales

Jackal or Tiger?

One hot night, in Hindustan, a king and queen lay awake in the palace in the midst of the city. Every now and then a faint air blew through the lattice, and they hoped they were going to sleep, but they never did. Presently they became more broad awake than…

Indian fairy tales

Keep it for the Beggar

When anything sweet is prepared in the house on a particular night, and when the children, after feeding to their fill, say to the mother:— “Ammâ, this pudding is sweet; keep it for the morning,” the mother says at once:— “Ask me to keep it for the beggar, and I…

Andrew Lang’s Fairy BooksIndian fairy tales

Kupti and Imani

Once there was a king who had two daughters; and their names were Kupti and Imani. He loved them both very much, and spent hours in talking to them, and one day he said to Kupti, the elder: ‘Are you satisfied to leave your life and fortune in my hands…

Indian fairy tales

Light Makes Prosperity

There is a Tamil proverb dîpam lakshmîkaram, meaning, “light makes prosperity,” and the following story is related to explain it:— In the town of Gôvindapâthî there lived a merchant named Paśupati Śeṭṭi, who had a son and a daughter. The son’s name was Vinîta and the daughter’s Garvî, and while…

Indian fairy tales

Little Anklebone

Once upon a time there was a little boy who lost his parents; so he went to live with his Auntie, and she set him to herd sheep. All day long the little fellow wandered barefoot through the pathless plain, tending his flock, and playing his tiny shepherd’s pipe from…

Indian fairy talesJoseph Jacobs

Loving Laili

Once there was a king called King Dantal, who had a great many rupees and soldiers and horses. He had also an only son called Prince Majnun, who was a handsome boy with white teeth, red lips, blue eyes, red cheeks, red hair, and a white skin. This boy was…

Andrew Lang’s Fairy BooksIndian fairy tales

Moti

Once upon a time there was a youth called Moti, who was very big and strong, but the clumsiest creature you can imagine. So clumsy was he that he was always putting his great feet into the bowls of sweet milk or curds which his mother set out on the…

Indian fairy tales

Mr. Mighty-of-his-Mouth

In two adjoining villages there lived two famous men. The one was called Mr. Mighty-of-his-mouth—one that could accomplish wonders with words alone. The other was called Mr. Mighty-of-his-hands—one who could make no use of that glib instrument the tongue, but was able to bear burdens, cut wood, and perform other…

Indian fairy tales

Mr. Won’t Give and Mr. Won’t Leave

In a certain town there lived a clever old Brâhmaṇ, named Won’t-Give(Vidâmundan). He used to go out daily and to beg in all the houses round, under the pretence that he had to feed several Brâhmaṇs in his own house. Good people, that believed in his words, used to give…

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