Hans Christian Andersen

Hans Christian Andersen

Ole-Luk-Oie, the dream god

There is nobody in the whole world who knows so many stories as Ole-Luk-Oie, or who can relate them so nicely. In the evening while the children are seated at the tea table or in their little chairs, very softly he comes up the stairs, for he walks in his…

Hans Christian Andersen

She Was Good for Nothing

The mayor stood at the open window. His shirt-frill was very fine, and so were his ruffles; he had a breast-pin stuck in his frill, and was uncommonly smooth-shaven—all his own work; certainly he had given himself a slight cut, but he had stuck a bit of newspaper on the…

Hans Christian Andersen

Something

“I want to be something!” said the eldest of five brothers. “I want to do something in the world. I don’t care how humble my position may be in society, if I only effect some good, for that will really be something. I’ll make bricks, for they are quite indispensable…

Hans Christian Andersen

Soup from Sausage Skewer

We had such an excellent dinner yesterday,” said an old lady-mouse to another who had not been present at the feast. “I sat number twenty-one below the mouse-king, which was not a bad place. Shall I tell you what we had? Everything was excellent—moldy bread, tallow candle, and sausage. “Then,…

Hans Christian Andersen

Sunshine Stories

“I am going to tell a story,” said the Wind. “I beg your pardon,” said the Rain, “but now it is my turn. Have you not been howling round the corner this long time, as hard as ever you could?” “Is this the gratitude you owe me?” said the Wind;…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Beetle

The emperor’s favourite horse was shod with gold. It had a golden shoe on each of its feet. And why was this? He was a beautiful creature, with delicate legs, bright intelligent eyes, and a mane that hung down over his neck like a veil. He had carried his master…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Bell-Deep

“Ding-dong ding-dong!” It sounds up from the “bell-deep” in the Odense-Au. Every child in the old town of Odense, on the island of Funen, knows the Au, which washes the gardens round about the town, and flows on under the wooden bridges from the dam to the water-mill. In the…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Bishop of Borglum and His Warriors

Our scene is in Northern Jutland, in the so called “wild moor.” We hear what is called the “Wester-wow-wow”—the peculiar roar of the North Sea as it breaks against the western coast of Jutland. It rolls and thunders with a sound that penetrates for miles into the land; and we…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Bond of Friendship

We have just taken a little journey, and already we want to take a longer one. Whither? To Sparta, to Mycene, to Delphi? There are a hundred places at whose names the heart beats with the desire of travel. On horseback we go up the mountain paths, through brake and…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Bottle Neck

In the narrow, crooked street, among several shabby dwellings, stood a very tall and very narrow house, the framework of which had given so that it was out of joint in every direction. Only poor people lived here, and poorest of all were those who lived in the attic. Outside…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Butterfly

There was once a butterfly who wished for a bride; and, as may be supposed, he wanted to choose a very pretty one from among the flowers. He glanced with a very critical eye at all the flower beds and found that the flowers were seated quietly and demurely on…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Child in the Grave

There was mourning in the house, sorrow in every heart. The youngest child, a boy four years old, the joy and hope of his parents, had died. There still remained to them two daughters, the elder of whom was about to be confirmed—good, charming girls both; but the child that…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Conceited Apple Branch

It was the month of May. The wind still blew cold, but from bush and tree, field and flower, came the welcome sound, “Spring is come.” Wild flowers in profusion covered the hedges. Under the little apple tree Spring seemed busy, and he told his tale from one of the…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Cripple

There was an old country-house which belonged to young, wealthy people. They had riches and blessings, they liked to enjoy themselves, but they did good as well, they wished to make everybody as happy as they were themselves. On Christmas Eve a beautifully decorated Christmas tree stood in the old…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Daisy

Now listen. Out in the country, close by the roadside, stood a pleasant house; you have seen one like it, no doubt, very often. In front lay a little fenced-in garden, full of blooming flowers. Near the hedge, in the soft green grass, grew a little daisy. The sun shone…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Darning-Needle

There was once a Darning-needle who thought herself so fine that she came at last to believe that she was fit for embroidery. “Mind now that you hold me fast,” she said to the Fingers that took her up. “Pray don’t lose me. If I should fall on the ground…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Drop of Water

You know, surely, what the microscope is—that wonderful little glass which makes everything appear a hundred times larger than it really is. If you look through a microscope at a single drop of ditch water, you will see a thousand odd-looking creatures, such as you never could imagine dwelled in…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Dumb Book

By the high-road in the forest lay a lonely peasant’s hut; the road went right through the farmyard. The sun shone down, and all the windows were open. In the house was bustle and movement; but in the garden, in an arbour of blossoming elder, stood an open coffin. A…

Page 2 of 6123456