Hans Christian Andersen

Hans Christian Andersen

The Little Match Girl

It was dreadfully cold; it was snowing fast, and was almost dark, as evening came on—the last evening of the year. In the cold and the darkness, there went along the street a poor little girl, bareheaded and with naked feet. When she left home she had slippers on, it…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Little Mermaid

Far out in the ocean, where the water is as blue as the prettiest cornflower and as clear as crystal, it is very, very deep; so deep, indeed, that no cable could sound it, and many church steeples, piled one upon another, would not reach from the ground beneath to…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Loving Pair

A whipping Top and a Ball lay close together in a drawer among other playthings. One day the Top said to the Ball, “Since we are living so much together, why should we not be lovers?” But the Ball, being made of morocco leather, thought herself a very high-bred lady,…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Lucky Peer

I. In the principal street there stood a fine old-fashioned house; the wall about the court-yard had bits of glass worked into it, so that when the sun or moon shone, it was as if covered with diamonds. That was a sign of wealth, and there was wealth inside there;…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Lucky Peer – Part V

Early in the morning the first study hours began at Herr Gabriel’s. They studied French. At breakfast the only ones present were the boarders, the children, and Madame. She drank here her second cup of coffee her first she always took in bed. “It is so wholesome, when one is liable…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Lucky Peer – Parts III and IV

A good many thoughts went through little Peer’s head, and one Sunday, when he had his best clothes on, he started out without saying a word about it to his mother or grandmother, not even to Miss Frandsen, who always gave him good advice, straight to the chapel-master; he thought this…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Lucky Peer – Parts VI and IX

Now get that comedy out of your head!” said Herr Gabriel the next morning, “and let us squeeze in some science.” Peer had come near to thinking like young Madsen: “that one was giving up his fresh youth when he was shut up and set down with a book in his…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Lucky Peer – Parts X, XI and XII

Once a week there was quartette music. Ears, soul, and thought were filled with the grand musical poems of Beethoven and Mozart. For a long time Peer had heard no good and well-given music. It was as if a kiss of fire darted down his spine and shot through all…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Marsh King’s Daughter

The storks tell their little ones very many stories, all of the moor and the marsh. These stories are generally adapted to the age and capacity of the hearers. The youngest are content if they are told “Kribble-krabble, plurre-murre” as a story, and find it charming; but the older ones…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Metal Pig

In the city of Florence, not far from the Piazza del Granduca, runs a little cross street called Porta Rosa. In this street, just in front of the market place where vegetables are sold, stands a pig, made of brass and curiously formed. The color has been changed by age…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Money Box

In a nursery where a number of toys lay scattered about, a money box stood on the top of a very high wardrobe. It was made of clay in the shape of a pig and had been bought of the potter. In the back of the pig was a slit,…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Old Bachelor’s Nightcap

There is a street in Copenhagen that has this strange name—”Hysken Sträde.” Whence comes this name, and what is its meaning? It is said to be German; but injustice has been done to the Germans in this matter, for it would have to be “Häuschen,” and not “Hysken.” For here…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Old Gravestone

In a little provincial town, in the time of the year when people say “the evenings are drawing in,” there was one evening quite a social gathering in the home of a father of a family. The weather was still mild and warm. The lamp gleamed on the table; the…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Old House

A very old house once stood in a street with several others that were quite new and clean. One could read the date it had been erected, which had been carved on one of the beams and surrounded by scrolls formed of tulips and hop tendrils; by this date it…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Old Street Lamp

Did you ever hear the story of the old street lamp? It is not remarkably interesting, but for once you may as well listen to it. It was a most respectable old lamp, which had seen many, many years of service and now was to retire with a pension. It…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Pea Blossom

There were once five peas in one shell; they were green, and the shell was green, and so they believed that the whole world must be green also, which was a very natural conclusion. The shell grew, and the peas grew; and as they grew they arranged themselves all in…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Pen and the Inkstand

In a poet’s room, where his inkstand stood on the table, the remark was once made: “It is wonderful what can be brought out of an inkstand. What will come next? It is indeed wonderful.” “Yes, certainly,” said the inkstand to the pen and to the other articles that stood…

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