Hans Christian Andersen

Hans Christian Andersen

The Phoenix Bird

In the Garden of Paradise, beneath the Tree of Knowledge, bloomed a rose bush. Here, in the first rose, a bird was born: his flight was like the flashing of light, his plumage was beauteous, and his song ravishing. But when Eve plucked the fruit of the knowledge of good…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Pigs

Charles Dickens once told us about a pig, and since that time we are in a good humour if we only hear one grunt. St. Antony took the pig under his protection; and when we think of the prodigal son we always associate with him the idea of feeding swine;…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Portuguese Duck

A duck once arrived from Portugal. There were some who said she came from Spain, but that is almost the same thing. At all events, she was called the Portuguese duck, and she laid eggs, was killed and cooked, and that was the end of her. The ducklings which crept…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Princess and the Pea

There was once a prince who wanted to marry a princess. But she must be a real princess, mind you. So he traveled all round the world, seeking such a one, but everywhere something was in the way. Not that there was any lack of princesses, but he could not…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Puppet Showman

On board the steamer was an elderly man with such a merry face that, if it did not belie him, he must have been the happiest fellow in creation. And, indeed, he declared he was the happiest man; I heard it out of his own mouth. He was a Dane,…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Races

A prize, or rather two prizes, a great one and a small one, had been awarded for the greatest swiftness in running,—not in a single race, but for the whole year. “I obtained the first prize,” said the hare. “Justice must still be carried out, even when one has relations…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Red Shoes

There was once a pretty, delicate little girl, who was so poor that she had to go barefoot in summer and wear coarse wooden shoes in winter, which made her little instep quite red. In the center of the village there lived an old shoemaker’s wife. One day this good…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Roses and the Sparrows

It really appeared as if something very important were going on by the duck pond, but this was not the case. A few minutes before, all the ducks had been resting on the water or standing on their heads—for that they can do—and then they all swam in a bustle…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep

Have you ever seen an old wooden cabinet, quite worn black with age, and ornamented with all sorts of carved figures and flourishes? Just such a one stood in a certain parlor. It was a legacy from the great-grandmother, and was covered from top to bottom with carved roses and…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Snow Man

“It’s so wonderfully cold that my whole body crackles!” said the Snow Man. “This is a kind of wind that can blow life into one; and how the gleaming one up yonder is staring at me.” He meant the sun, which was just about to set. “It shall not make…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Snow Queen

First Story WHICH DESCRIBES A LOOKING-GLASS AND ITS BROKEN FRAGMENTS You must attend to the beginning of this story, for when we get to the end we shall know more than we now do about a very wicked hobgoblin; he was one of the most mischievous of all sprites, for…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Snowman

It is so delightfully cold that it makes my whole body crackle,” said the Snow Man. “This is just the kind of wind to blow life into one. How that great red thing up there is staring at me!” He meant the sun, which was just setting. “It shall not…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Steadfast Tin Soldier

There were once five and twenty tin soldiers. They were brothers, for they had all been made out of the same old tin spoon. They all shouldered their bayonets, held themselves upright, and looked straight before them. Their uniforms were very smart-looking—red and blue—and very splendid. The first thing they…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Stone of the Wiseman

Far away in the land of India, far away towards the East, at the end of the world, stood the Tree of the Sun, a noble tree, such as we have never seen, and shall probably never see. The crown stretched out several miles around: it was really an entire…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Storks

On the last house in the village there lay a stork’s nest. The mother stork sat in it with her four little ones, who were stretching out their heads with their pointed black bills that had not yet turned red. At a little distance, on the top of the roof,…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Story of the Year

It was far in January, and a terrible fall of snow was pelting down. The snow eddied through the streets and lanes; the window-panes seemed plastered with snow on the outside; snow plumped down in masses from the roofs: and a sudden hurry had seized on the people, for they…

Hans Christian Andersen

The Swan’s Nest

Between the Baltic and the North Sea there lies an old swan’s nest, wherein swans are born and have been born that shall never die. In olden times a flock of swans flew over the Alps to the green plains around Milan, where it was delightful to dwell. This flight of…

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