La Fontaine fables

La Fontaine fables

The Wallet

From heaven, one day, did Jupiter proclaim, “Let all that live before my throne appear, And there if any one hath aught to blame, In matter, form, or texture of his frame, He may bring forth his grievance without fear. Redress shall instantly be given to each. Come, monkey, now,…

La Fontaine fables

The Wax Candle

From bowers of gods the bees came down to man. On Mount Hymettus, first, they say, They made their home, and stored away The treasures which the zephyrs fan. When men had robb’d these daughters of the sky, And left their palaces of nectar dry,— Or, in English as the…

La Fontaine fables

The Weasel in the Granary

A weasel through a hole contrived to squeeze, (She was recovering from disease,) Which led her to a farmer’s hoard. There lodged, her wasted form she cherish’d; Heaven knows the lard and victuals stored That by her gnawing perish’d! Of which the consequence Was sudden corpulence. A week or so…

La Fontaine fables

The Wolf Accusing the Fox

A wolf, affirming his belief That he had suffer’d by a thief, Brought up his neighbour fox— Of whom it was by all confess’d, His character was not the best— To fill the prisoner’s box. As judge between these vermin, A monkey graced the ermine; And truly other gifts of…

La Fontaine fables

The Wolf and the Fox

“Dear wolf,” complain’d a hungry fox, “A lean chick’s meat, or veteran cock’s, Is all I get by toil or trick: Of such a living I am sick. With far less risk, you’ve better cheer; A house you need not venture near, But I must do it, spite of fear.…

La Fontaine fables

The Wolf and the Lean Dog

A Troutling, some time since, Endeavour’d vainly to convince A hungry fisherman Of his unfitness for the frying-pan. The fisherman had reason good— The troutling did the best he could— Both argued for their lives. Now, if my present purpose thrives, I’ll prop my former proposition By building on a…

La Fontaine fables

The Wolf Turned Shepherd

A wolf, whose gettings from the flocks Began to be but few, Bethought himself to play the fox In character quite new. A shepherd’s hat and coat he took, A cudgel for a crook, Nor e’en the pipe forgot: And more to seem what he was not, Himself upon his…

La Fontaine fables

The Wolf, the Goat and the Kid

As went a goat of grass to take her fill, And browse the herbage of a distant hill, She latch’d her door, and bid, With matron care, her kid; “My daughter, as you live, This portal don’t undo To any creature who This watchword does not give: ‘Deuce take the…

La Fontaine fables

The Woodman and Mercury

A man that labour’d in the wood Had lost his honest livelihood; That is to say, His axe was gone astray. He had no tools to spare; This wholly earn’d his fare. Without a hope beside, He sat him down and cried, “Alas, my axe! where can it be? O…

La Fontaine fables

The Woods and the Woodman

A certain wood-chopper lost or broke From his axe’s eye a bit of oak. The forest must needs be somewhat spared While such a loss was being repair’d. Came the man at last, and humbly pray’d That the woods would kindly lend to him— A moderate loan—a single limb, Whereof…

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