La Fontaine fables

The Rat and the Elephant

the rat and the elephant

A rat, of quite the smallest size,
Fix’d on an elephant his eyes,
And jeer’d the beast of high descent
Because his feet so slowly went.
Upon his back, three stories high,
There sat, beneath a canopy,
A certain sultan of renown,
His dog, and cat, and wife sublime,
His parrot, servant, and his wine,
All pilgrims to a distant town.
The rat profess’d to be amazed
That all the people stood and gazed
With wonder, as he pass’d the road,
Both at the creature and his load.
“As if,” said he, “to occupy
A little more of land or sky
Made one, in view of common sense,
Of greater worth and consequence!
What see ye, men, in this parade,
That food for wonder need be made?
The bulk which makes a child afraid?
In truth, I take myself to be,
In all aspects, as good as he.”
And further might have gone his vaunt;
But, darting down, the cat
Convinced him that a rat
Is smaller than an elephant.

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