Fairytales, folktales and fables for kids

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu’s Friends Forsook Him

Now, on the first day, Raja Rasâlu journeyed far, until he came to a lonely forest, where he halted for the night. And seeing it was a desolate place, and the night dark, he determined to set a watch. So he divided the time into three watches, and the carpenter…

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu Played Chaupur With King Sarkap

Now, when evening came, Raja Rasâlu went forth to play chaupur with King Sarkap, and as he passed some potters’ kilns he saw a cat wandering about restlessly; so he asked what ailed her that she never stood still, and she replied, ‘My kittens are in an unbaked pot in…

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu Killed the Giants

Now, after a time, Raja Rasâlu arrived at Nila city, and as he entered the town he saw an old woman making unleavened bread, and as she made it she sometimes wept, and sometimes laughed; so Rasâlu asked her why she wept and laughed, but she answered sadly, as she…

Indian fairy tales

How Raja Rasalu Became a Jogi

Then, after a time, Rasâlu went to Hodinagari. And when he reached the house of the beautiful far-famed Queen Sundrân, he saw an old Jôgi sitting at the gate, by the side of his sacred fire. ‘Wherefore do you sit there, father?’ asked Raja Rasâlu. ‘My son,’ returned the Jôgi,…

Indian fairy tales

The Honest but Rash Hunter

Second Part When the Second Minister’s watch was over, he went to inspect the guard at the royal bedchamber, and Alakesa hearing his footsteps inquired who was there. “Your servant, Bodhachandra, most royal lord,” was the reply. “Enter, Bodhachandra,” said the king; “I have somewhat to communicate to you.” Then…

Indian fairy tales

The Hermit’s Daughter

Chapter I Near a town in India called Ikshumati, on a beautiful wide river, with trees belonging to a great forest near its banks, there dwelt a holy man named Mana Kanaka, who spent a great part of his life praying to God. He had lost his wife when his…

Indian fairy talesJoseph Jacobs

How the Wicked Sons Were Duped

How the wicked sons were duped A very wealthy old man, imagining that he was on the point of death, sent for his sons and divided his property among them. However, he did not die for several years afterwards; and miserable years many of them were. Besides the weariness of…

Indian fairy talesJoseph Jacobs

Harisarman

There was a certain Brahman in a certain village, named Harisarman. He was poor and foolish and in evil case for want of employment, and he had very many children, that he might reap the fruit of his misdeeds in a former life. He wandered about begging with his family,…

Indian fairy tales

The Grain of Corn

Once upon a time a farmer’s wife was winnowing corn, when a crow, flying past, swooped off with a grain from the winnowing basket and perched on a tree close by to eat it. The farmer’s wife, greatly enraged, flung a clod at the bird with so good an aim…

Andrew Lang’s Fairy BooksIndian fairy tales

Grasp All, Lose All

Once, in former times, there lived in a certain city in India a poor oil-seller, called Déna, who never could keep any money in his pockets; and when this story begins he had borrowed from a banker, of the name of Lena, the sum of one hundred rupees; which, with…

Indian fairy tales

Good Luck to the Lucky One; Or Shall I Fall Down?

In a certain town there lived a wealthy Brâhmiṇ. He wished to build a house—pretty large and spacious—as became his riches. For that purpose he called in a great number of soothsayers, and fixed, guided by their scientific opinion, a place for building the mansion. A certain portion of every…

Indian fairy tales

The Gardener’s Cunning Wife

In a certain village there lived with his wife a poor gardener who cultivated greens in a small patch in the backyard of his house. They were in thirty little beds, half of which he would water every day. This occupied him from the fifth to the fifteenth ghaṭikâ. His…

Indian fairy tales

Good Will Grow Out of Good

In a certain town there reigned a king named Patnîpriya, to whose court, a poor old Brâhmiṇ, named Pâpabhîru, came every morning, with a yellow lime in his hand, and presenting it to the king, pronounced a benediction in Tamil:— Nanmai vidaittâl, nanmai vil̤aiyum: Tîmai vidaittâl, tîmai vijaiyum: Nanmaiyum tîmaiyum…

Indian fairy tales

The Good Husband and the Bad Wife

In a remote village there lived a Brâhmiṇ whose good nature and charitable disposition were proverbial. Equally proverbial also were the ill-nature and uncharitable disposition of the Brâhmaṇî—his wife. But as Paramêśvara (God) had joined them in matrimony, they had to live together as husband and wife, though their temperaments…